The Loneliness of Being Human

My quick opinion on the subject matter.

Photo by Oleksandra Petrova on Unsplash

We’re all lonely. It’s a universal condition. And it’s one that we often suffer in silence because admitting that we’re lonely feels like acknowledging that we’re failing somehow. But the truth is that loneliness is a natural and essential part of being human. It’s how we grow and how we learn to connect with others. So why do we suffer from it so much?

The answer, I think, lies in the fact that we are both social animals and individual beings. We need others to survive, but we also need to stand on our own two feet. This can be a difficult balance to strike, and it often leaves us feeling isolated and alone.

On the one hand, we have an innate need for connection. We are born into this world completely helpless, and without the care of others, we would not survive. In fact, studies have shown that infants who are not adequately nurtured can die from loneliness. As infants, we depend on others for our very survival.

But at the same time, we also need to learn how to be independent. We need to make our way in the world without the constant support of others. This is a complicated process and can often leave us feeling lost and alone. But it’s essential to growing up and becoming who we are meant to be.

Loneliness is a natural and vital part of being human. It’s how we grow and how we learn to connect with others. So why do we suffer from it so much? I think the answer lies in the fact that we are both social animals and individual beings. We need others to survive, but we also need to be able to stand on our own two feet. This can be a difficult balance to strike, but it’s one that each of us must find a way to manage if we want to lead happy and fulfilling lives.

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Edy Zoo

Edy Zoo is an author who writes about social subjects. He contributes to the ever-growing library of social critics.